Doctoral school “Chinese Buddhist Iconography and Manuscript Culture: Fieldwork Data and their Use in Pedagogical Contexts, with an Emphasis on Digital Resources”, June 17-21, 2024

Abstract: Field work activities and the study of manuscripts are vital aspects of conducting research in East Asian Buddhist Studies, and both the fields of analysing iconography and deciphering and contextualizing manuscripts have undergone rapid changes during the last decade, mainly driven by innovations in the field of Digital Humanities. This course aims to provide participants with first-hand insights concerning fieldwork activities conducted in the context of the long-term FROGBEAR project “From the Ground Up: Buddhism and East Asian Religions”, and to discuss how the collected data can be used in research and teaching environments.

Doctoral school: Call for applications

“Chinese Buddhist Iconography and Manuscript Culture: Fieldwork Data and their Use in Pedagogical Contexts, with an Emphasis on Digital Resources”

June 17-21, 2024

Venue: Simon Stevin room (Ghent University campus)

We are happy to announce an upcoming Doctoral School (DS), organized by Ghent University and co-sponsored by the FROGBEAR project “From the Ground Up: Buddhism and East Asian Religions”. The DS, lasting for five days (June 17-21, 2024), and the additional two days with public lectures (June 22-23, 2024), are related to the concluding events of the FROGBEAR project (which will end in September 2024), and previous fieldwork activities and collected fieldwork data will be the main topics discussed during these seven days.

Whereas the participation in the DS is restricted to local PhD and Postdoctoral researchers (in addition to five international PhD students), the subsequent two-day event is targeted at a general audience. The schedule and the programme of these two days will be announced at a later date.

Thanks to the generous support provided by the FROGBEAR (UBC) project, we are pleased to award up to five scholarships for international PhD students. This money can be used for travel, accommodation, and meals. To apply for this travel grant, please send a one-page cover letter and your CV to christoph.anderl@ugent.be by March 31st, 2024.

Two 800 Euro scholarships for long distance (outside Europe) attendance

Three 600 Euro scholarships for short distance (inside Europe) attendance

Organizers

Prof. Dr. Christoph Anderl

Prof. Dr. Ann Heirman

Ghent University, Faculty of Arts and Philosophy

Department of Languages and Cultures

Contact E-mail: Christoph.anderl@ugent.be

Course description

Title: Chinese Buddhist Iconography and Manuscript Culture: Fieldwork Data and their Use in Pedagogical Contexts, with an Emphasis on Digital Resources

Dates: June 17-21, 2024

Number of contact hours: ca. 25

Abstract:

Field work activities and the study of manuscripts are vital aspects of conducting research in East Asian Buddhist Studies, and both the fields of analysing iconography and deciphering and contextualizing manuscripts have undergone rapid changes during the last decade, mainly driven by innovations in the field of Digital Humanities. This course aims to provide participants with first-hand insights concerning fieldwork activities conducted in the context of the long-term FROGBEAR project “From the Ground Up: Buddhism and East Asian Religions”, and to discuss how the collected data can be used in research and teaching environments.

Objectives of the course (learning outcomes):

The objectives of the course are to offer an overview of new developments in fieldwork-based research, especially:

• the use of new technologies (e.g., 3D photography) and the preparation of data for large-scale publicly accessible databases;

• to train the students to adapt fieldwork techniques and approaches to specific locations and environments;

• to approach research goals based on multiple sources and resources, e.g., the combined study of iconography and manuscript materials, indispensable for research in many areas of China, especially in the north-western regions;

• to provide the participants with practical knowledge of how various digital tools and databases can be used in teaching and other pedagogical environments;

• to concretely discuss the above aspects in the context of ongoing PhD projects involving the study of iconography and manuscripts, with the aim of increasing the feasibility and effectivity of fieldwork, production, and use of data in these projects.

Relevance of the course to the PhD research conducted at Ghent University:

This course is highly relevant for PhD and postdoctoral projects conducted at the Department of Languages and Cultures. Several PhD projects directly deal with image and manuscript materials from the north-western region of China, in particular from Dunhuang and Turfan situated at the medieval Silk Road, in addition to other sites such as Sichuan Buddhist cave and cliff temples, and the monumental cave and cliff sites of Longmen and Yungang.

Teaching methods:

Lectures: 10 hours

Discussions and exercises: 5 hours

Source analysis / seminars / readings: 5 hours

PhD students’ presentations: 6+ hours

Evaluation criteria:

Attendance and output (active participation and presentations)

Lecturers:

Michelle C. Wang

Name and affiliation: Michelle C. Wang, Professor at the Department of Art and Art History, Georgetown University

Michelle C. Wang 王慧蘭 is a specialist in the Buddhist and Silk Road art of Northwestern China, primarily of the 6th-10th centuries. Her first book Mandalas in the Making: The Visual Culture of Esoteric Buddhism at Dunhuang (Brill, 2018) examines Buddhist mandalas of the 8th-10th centuries at the Mogao and Yulin Buddhist cave shrines in northwestern China. As the first scholarly monograph on Buddhist mandalas in China, this book considers the religious, cultural, and architectural contexts in which they appeared. In addition to her research on mandalas, she has also written about art and ritual, miracle tales of animated statues, the transcultural reception of Buddhist motifs, Buddhist materiality, and text and image. She co-organized the 2014-2015 Mellon Foundation-funded Sawyer Seminar “Critical Silk Road Studies” and co-directed the Luce Foundation-funded Georgetown-International Dunhuang Project for North American Silk Road Collections in 2016-2017, which continued in 2020-2022 with support from the Dunhuang Foundation. She is one of the founding board members of the Association for Chinese Art History and faculty PI for the open access resource Digital Index of Dunhuang Art. Her current book project, tentatively titled Desert Ruins, Colonial Exploration, and the Silk Road Imaginaire, examines the reception of medieval Silk Road sites in the photographs of explorer Marc Aurel Stein (1862-1943) and their intersections with colonial discourses of climate change, linguistics, and ethnography.

Wendy Yu Sau Ling

Name and affiliation: Wendy Yu Sau Ling, PhD, Research Assistant at the Centre of Buddhist Studies at the University of Hong Kong

Wendy Yu Sau Ling 余秀玲 received her PhD in Buddhist Art from the Centre of Buddhist Studies at the University of Hong Kong in 2024. Her research focuses on exploring the aesthetic aspects of Buddhism as expressed through its art. Wendy Yu is passionate about promoting the aesthetical aspect and beauty ideals found in Buddhist art through her research. Wendy is also an avid birdwatcher, bird artist and serves as an EXCO member of the Hong Kong Birdwatching Society. Her passion for birds extends to her research, where she specifically focuses on the bird imagery found in Buddhist art. One notable highlight of her academic journey is her thesis, which is an innovative, cross-disciplinary investigation of Pure Land birds integrating archaeological materials, textual evidence and ornithological knowledge. Birds preach the dharma in Amitabha’s Pure Land, and Dr. Yu acts as a bridge to share their fascinating narratives and make them accessible to a wider public. Currently, she works as a Research Assistant at the Centre of Buddhist Studies at the University of Hong Kong, where she is responsible for conducting research activities related to Buddhist art. Additionally, she volunteers as a docent at Tsz Shan Monastery Buddhist Art Museum and Hong Kong Palace Museum.

LIA WEI

Name and affiliation: Lia Wei (Associate Professor at Inalco, Paris)

Lia Wei is associate professor in Chinese art history at the Institut national des langues et civilisations orientales (Inalco). She has been conducting research in China since 2009, with a focus on medieval Buddhist epigraphy and cave temples in Northeast China (Shandong, Hebei, Henan provinces) as well as funerary landscapes in Southwest China (Sichuan, Chongqing, Guizhou, Yunnan, Hubei and Hunan provinces). She received her PhD with a thesis entitled ‘Highland Routes and Frontier Communities at the Fall of the Han Empire (2nd to 3rd century CE): A Comparative Study of Cave Burials South of the Yangzi River’ at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS). In 2018-2021, she was based at the Department of Archaeology and Museum Studies in Renmin University of China. In parallel to her activity as an art historian/archaeologist, she practices seal carving and ink paintign, and designs projects that combine academic and artistic research (Ink Art Week in Venice 2018, Lithic Impressions Venice 2018, Ink Brussels 2019, Les cinq couleurs de l’encre 2022, Pratique de l’estampage 2023).

Christoph Anderl

Name and affiliation: Christoph Anderl, Professor at the Department of Languages and Cultures, Ghent University

Christoph Anderl specializes on medieval Chinese manuscript culture, Buddhist Chinese, and various topics related to the development and adaptation of Chinese Buddhism during the Tang and Five Dynasties periods. During the last years, his focus has been on the study of modes of representation of Buddhist narratives in textual and visual media, including methodological and theoretical issues concerning the interrelation of text and image. In this context, he has also acted as leader of the Research Cluster “Typologies of Text-Image Relations” in the large UBC-based interdisciplinary project “From the Ground Up: Buddhism and East Asian Religions”, with ca. 30 participating universities. In order to study text-image relations and modes of representations in specific contexts, he has organized several conferences/seminars, as well as conducted fieldwork in China and Bangkok, leading groups of participants from international universities. Anderl is also the editor-in-chief of a database of non-canonical Dunhuang texts and character variants found in Dunhuang texts and other materials of the medieval period, a long-term project conducted in collaboration with Asian and European universities. For current projects, see Professor Anderl’s profile at the research portal of the Ghent Centre for Buddhist Studies.

Ann Heirman

Name and affiliation: Ann Heirman, Professor at the Department of Languages and Cultures, Ghent University

Ann Heirman, Ph.D. (1998) in Oriental Languages and Cultures, is professor of Chinese Language and Culture, head of the Department of Languages and Cultures and head of the Centre for Buddhist Studies at Ghent University in Belgium. She has published extensively on Chinese Buddhist monasticism and the development of disciplinary rules, including Rules for Nuns according to the Dharmaguptakavinaya (Motilal Banarsidass, 2002), The Spread of Buddhism (Brill, edited volume with Stephan Peter Bumbacher, 2007), A Pure Mind in a Clean Body (with Mathieu Torck, Academia Press, 2012), and Buddhist Encounters and Identities Across East Asia (Brill, edited volume with Carmen Meinert and Christoph Anderl, 2018). Her current research focuses on material culture, and lived experiences in Buddhist monastic life. For a full bibliography, see https://biblio.ugent.be/person/801001019567.

Program

(updated May 8, 2024)
Monday 17th June: Introductory lectures / Buddhist iconography
10.00 Welcome (Anderl, Heirman)
10.15-12.00 Digital Index of Dunhuang Art and other digital resources for the study of Dunhuang art (Wang)
12.00-13.30 Lunch
13.30-15.00 Lecture: Mural and Portable Painting Iconography: Images of Avalokiteśvara (Wang)
15:00-15:30 Coffee break
15.30-16.30 Lecture: Mural and Portable Painting Iconography: Images of Mañjuśrī (Wang)

Tuesday 18th June: Methodological applications
10.00-12.00 Lecture (with case studies): Working on Dunhuang Transformation tableaux: An introduction (Yu)
12.00-13.30 Lunch
13.30-14.30 Lecture/seminar/discussion: Painting Materials and Workshop Practice at Dunhuang (Wang)
14:30-14:50 Coffee break
14:50-16:00 The Khotanese Presence at Dunhuang (Wang)

Wednesday 19th June: Presentations / digital resources
10.00-12.00 Students’ presentations (with discussions; moderator: Anderl)
12.00-13.30 Lunch
13.30-14.30 Lecture / seminar: An introduction to the DMCT
database: Functions and tools for working with manuscripts / epigraphy (Anderl)
14:30-14:50 Coffee break
14.50-16.00 Lecture / seminar: Sichuan Buddhist sites and the Frogbear Research Database (Yu / Anderl)

Thursday 20th June: Presentations / Pedagogical approaches /fieldwork
10.00-11.00 Presentation: Fieldwork experiences in Bangkok and the work with fieldwork data (Johansen)
11.00-12.00 Fieldwork methods and protocole for epigraphy in mountainous environments and rock-cut sites (Wei)
12.00-13.30 Lunch
13.30-16.00 Students’ presentations (with discussions; moderator: Anderl / Yu / Wei)

Friday 21st June: Material culture / epigraphy
10.00-12.00 Lecture / exercises: Material culture through normative texts: some case studies (Heirman)
12.00.13.30 Lunch
13.30-15.00 Structuring metadata and agreeing on a descriptive vocabulary in the study of epigraphy (Wei)
15:00-15:30 Coffee break
15.30-16.30 Closing discussion (moderator: Anderl / Heirman / Wang / Wei)

Doctoral School “Systems of Representation in Asian Religious and Philosophical Traditions”, October 9–13, 2023

Abstract: Representation, a vital concept in accounting for how we perceive and engage with the world, has emerged as a significant subject across various fields, including anthropology, philosophy, religious studies, cultural studies, cognitive science, and visual culture. Focusing specifically on Asian religions, philosophy, and aesthetics, this course explores profound existential and ethical inquiries that have played a formative role in shaping and impacting those societies.

 

We are glad to announce our upcoming one-week Doctoral School “Systems of Representation in Asian Religious and Philosophical Traditions” and encourage interested students in applying to attend.

 

October 9th – 13th, 2023.

Venue: De Abt Meeting Center Ghent.

Organizers (Ghent Univ.)

Prof. Dr. Christoph Anderl,

Prof. Dr. Daniela De Simone,

Dr. Henry Albery.

 

Primary instructor:

Prof. Dr. Robert Yelle (Interfaculty Programme for the Study of Religion, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich)

 

Supporting instructors

Dr. Polina Lukicheva (Institute of Asian and Oriental Studies, University of Zurich)

Dr. Henry Albery (Junior Postdoctoral Fellow, Fonds Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (FWO), Department of Language and Cultures, Ghent University)

Dr. Juen Chien (Assistant Professor, Department of Buddhist Studies, Fo Guang University, Taiwan)

Prof. Dr. Christoph Anderl (Prof. of Chinese Language and Culture, Department of Languages and Cultures, Ghent University)

 

Registration

Ghent PhD students: Registration through the Doctoral Schools website

External participants: Please send an application to christoph.anderl@ugent.be. The Doctoral School accepts the participation of up to five external PhD researchers. Applicants should attach a short CV and letter of motivation to the email. For the accepted students, a fee waiver will apply. Application deadline: Sept. 10th.

 

Course description

Representation, a vital concept in accounting for how we perceive and engage with the world, has emerged as a significant subject across various fields, including anthropology, philosophy, religious studies, cultural studies, cognitive science, and visual culture. Focusing specifically on Asian religions, philosophy, and aesthetics, this course explores profound existential and ethical inquiries that have played a formative role in shaping and impacting those societies.

The objective of the course is to offer a systematic study of systems of representation and symbolism within Asian thought and practice and provide students with a cutting-edge conceptual apparatus in semiotics and anthropology, enhancing their theoretical grounding through an introduction to key concepts from these disciplines. It shall examine the evolution of systems of representation and their function in conveying complex concepts in different historical contexts and communities, providing the students with both a specialised knowledge in the history and cultural contexts of the regions considered, whilst fostering a comprehensive understanding of the terminologies and histories of specific forms of representation. Through an interrogation of fundamental theoretical frameworks, case studies, and analyses of textual and visual materials, the course is designed to equip students with the analytical, methodological and theoretical skills for usage in their research.

This course is specifically designed for doctoral students specialising in Buddhist studies and related fields which focus on the cultural traditions of Asia. It offers a deep exploration into the working of systems of representation and symbolism within specific cultural frameworks, illuminating their role in shaping existential and ethical attitudes and conveying religious and philosophical ideas. Through such an exploration, students will develop a new conceptual lens with which they shall nuance their understanding of the traditions they study.

The course covers a wide range of topics within the field, from establishing and exploring theoretical frameworks for studying the complexities of representation to examining concrete case studies. It includes the analysis of textual and visual materials, alongside an investigation into the terminology and history of concepts pertaining to the problematics of representation, e.g.:

• Multifaceted perspectives on representation: ontological assumptions, cognitive processes, and communicative functions;

• Symbolic systems and the construction of meaning: unravelling layers and referential dynamics in representation, such as pragmatic versus semantic functions;

• Representation and Transcendence: investigating the interactions between the perceived and unperceived, the sign and signlessness, form and formlessness and meaning and meaningless in ritual, meditative and aesthetic practices;

• Analysing terminology and concepts of representation: exploring philosophical theories and primary sources (including accounts on meditation, visualization, observation and contemplation. e.g., the conceptual history of guan 觀) and Buddhist theories of mind, perception and cognition;

• Representation and Aesthetics: exploring the intersection of artistic expression and (religious) symbolic systems;

• Exploring symbolism in Buddhist ritual practices and arts and the significance of (the representation of) the Buddha’s body.

 

Programme

Monday 9th October: Theories of representation

10.00 Welcome (Christoph Anderl and Daniela De Simone)

10.00-12.00 Lecture: “Conceptual Foundations of a Semiotics of Religion” * (Robert Yelle)

12.00-13.30 Lunch

13.30-15.00 Lecture: “From Semantics to Pragmatics in the Semiotics of Religion” (Robert Yelle)

15:00-15:15 Coffee break

15.15-16.30 Lecture: “Representation: Bridging the Gap Between Idealism and Realism” (Polina Lukicheva)

 

Tuesday 10th October: Methodological applications

10.00-12.00 Lecture: “The Semiotics of Ritual Performance” * (Robert Yelle)

12.00-13.30 Lunch

13.30-16.00 Source analysis: Case Studies from Ritual Traditions (Robert Yelle)

 

Wednesday 11th October: Perspectives from South Asia

10.00-12.00 Lecture: “The Structure and Function of Mantras” * (Robert Yelle)

12.00-13.30 Lunch

13.30-14.30 Source analysis: Case Studies from Selected Hindu and Buddhist Texts (Robert Yelle)

14:30-15:50 Coffee break

14.50-16.30 Student presentations (Moderator: Robert Yelle)

 

Thursday 12th October: Meditation traditions of Central and East Asia

10.00-12.00 Source analysis: “Semiotic Ideology and Buddhist meditation in Central Asia” (Henry Albery)

12.00-13.30 Lunch

13.30-16.00 Source analysis: “Mental representation in Yogācāra and Chan: the case of the three natures and guan 觀” (Chien Juen and Polina Lukicheva)

 

Friday 13th October: Representation and Narrative in Dunhuang

10.00-12.00 Source Analysis: Text-Image relations in the narration of Buddha’s life in Dunhuang Cave 61 (Christoph Anderl)

12.00.13.30 Lunch

13.30-15.30 Student presentations (Moderator: Christoph Anderl)

15.30-16.00 Closing discussion

 

Reading materials: A list of recommended reading materials will be sent to the participants ca. three weeks prior to the beginning of the Doctoral School.

 

Note: Lectures marked with * are planned to be open to the general public and will be broadcast via Zoom. After registration for the public lectures (via email to christoph.anderl@ugent.be), a Zoom link will be sent.

 

Update: doctoral school pictures

Doctoral School “Buddhism and Law in China”, June 19–23, 2023

Abstract: This (on campus) course will focus on how Buddhists in China engage(d) with various aspects of the Buddhist monastic law (Vinaya). It will cover discussions on clerical immunity for ordained Buddhists in Buddhist legal texts; Chinese transformation of jurisdictional negotiation between the state and the Buddhist establishment; and case studies of Buddhist engagements with state law and Buddhist religious law in modern and contemporary China.

 

We are pleased to announce the following Doctoral School at Ghent University (Belgium):

“Buddhism and Law in China”

Date: June 19-23, 2023.
Venue: Het Pand (Ghent University).
Organizing committee: prof. dr. Ann Heirman, prof. dr. Christoph Anderl (Ghent University).

Description
This (on campus) course will focus on how Buddhists in China engage(d) with various aspects of the Buddhist monastic law (Vinaya). It will cover discussions on clerical immunity for ordained Buddhists in Buddhist legal texts; Chinese transformation of jurisdictional negotiation between the state and the Buddhist establishment; and case studies of Buddhist engagements with state law and Buddhist religious law in modern and contemporary China. The course is designed for doctoral students with backgrounds or seeking further training in Buddhist studies, East Asian Studies, Chinese Studies, Chinese Religion, Chinese Law, and Religion and law. This course will combine lectures, primary text readings, film screenings, discussions, and student presentations. Students will have ample time to learn and grow from interactive lectures, hands on exercises in working with primary sources, and opportunities to present work in progress.

Thanks to the generous support of the Tianzhu Foundation, we are pleased to award up to 500 Euros in travel remuneration for a maximum of 5 international PhD students. This money can be used for travel, accommodation, and meals. To apply for this travel grant, please send a one-page motivation letter and your CV to Mathieu.Torck@UGent.be by April 20. The selected candidates will be notified by May 1. Candidates who are not selected for the travel grant may still participate on their own means depending on the available places (inquiries should be sent to the same e-mail address).

Lecturers
Prof. Cuilan Liu, University of Pittsburgh (lecturer)
Prof. Ester Bianchi, University of Perugia (guest lecturer)

Tentative schedule
The five-day course will have ca. 5 contact hours a day (23 contact hours all together) that include lectures, text readings, presentations by the participants, and discussions.

Monday, June 19: Indian Origins

10:00-10:30: Welcome and introductions
10:30-12:00: Buddhist Clerical Immunity: Can Kings Punish a Monk Criminal in India? (Cuilan Liu)
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-16:00: Text Reading: Shilun jing 十輪經 (Chinese and Tibetan translations) (Cuilan Liu)**

Tuesday, June 20: Chinese Inventions
10:00-12:00: Hybrid Courts and Hybrid Laws: How Did Chinese Buddhists Reinvent the Indian Model for Clerical Immunity? (Cuilan Liu)
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-16:00: Text Readings: Chinese Texts related to Daoseng ge 道僧格 (Cuilan Liu)**

Wednesday, June 21: Vinaya Movements in Modern Chinese Buddhism
10:00-12:00: Vinaya Trends in Twentieth Century China and Beyond. With a Focus on Monastic Ordination (Ester Bianchi)
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-15:30: Screening of Documentary Films
15:30-16:30: Student Research Projects Presentation (moderated by Ester Bianchi)

Thursday, June 22: Case Study in Contemporary China
10:00-12:00: When Buddhist Law and State Law Clash: What Happens to a Deceased Monk’s Inheritance and Living Heirs? (Cuilan Liu)
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-15:30: Text Reading: the Pure Rules 清规 and the Chinese Law of Succession 继承
法 (Cuilan Liu)**
15: 30-16:30: Student Research Projects Presentation (moderated by Cuilan Liu)

Friday, June 23: Case Study in Contemporary China
10:00-12:00: The Dragon Spring Temple: Are Buddhists and Buddhist Institutions Immune from Legal Entanglements? (Cuilan Liu)
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-14:30: Postdoctoral Project Presentation
14:30-15:30: Open discussion on the study of Buddhism and Law: Topics, Primary Texts, and Methodologies (moderated by Cuilan Liu)
** Sinological background needed (7 hours)

Update: doctoral school pictures

Doctoral School “Demystifying Chan (Japanese: Zen) Buddhism”, July 4-8, 2022

Abstract: This (on campus) course is aimed at PhD students and will focus on the rise and success of Chan Buddhism (known in Japan as Zen) in medieval China. It will cover (1) Indian and Chinese doctrinal antecedents; (2) the emergence of new modes of ritual and literary expression, drawing from both Indian and Chinese exemplars; and (3) the specific contributions of the “public case” literature (gong’an, Japanese kōan) to ongoing philosophical controversies that galvanized the medieval Buddhist scholastic community.

 

We are pleased to announce the following Doctoral School at Ghent University: “Demystifying Chan (Japanese: Zen) Buddhism”
Date: July 4-8, 2022
Venue: Het Pand (Ghent University)
Organizing committee: prof. dr. Ann Heirman, prof. dr. Christoph Anderl, prof. dr. Anna Andreeva (Ghent University)

Description

This (on campus) course is aimed at PhD students and will focus on the rise and success of Chan Buddhism (known in Japan as Zen) in medieval China. It will cover (1) Indian and Chinese doctrinal antecedents; (2) the emergence of new modes of ritual and literary expression, drawing from both Indian and Chinese exemplars; and (3) the specific contributions of the “public case” literature (gong’an, Japanese kōan) to ongoing philosophical controversies that galvanized the medieval Buddhist scholastic community.
Thanks to the generous support of the Tianzhu foundation, we are pleased to award up to 800 Euros in travel remuneration for a maximum of 5 international PhD
students. This money can be used for travel, accommodation, and meals. To apply for this travel grant, please send a one-page motivation letter and your CV
to Mathieu.Torck@UGent.be by April 20. The selected candidates will be notified by May 1. Candidates who are not selected for the travel grant may still participate on their own means depending on the available places (inquiries should sent to the same e-mail address).

Lecturers

Prof. Robert Sharf, University of California, Berkeley.
Prof. Christoph Anderl, Ghent University

Tentative schedule

The five-day course will have 4 to 4.5 contact hours a day (21 contact hours all together) that include lectures, text readings, presentations by the participants, and
discussions.
Monday, July 4: Orientations
10:00-10:30: Welcome and introductions*
10:30-12:00: Philosophical background to Chan Buddhism (or, Thinking about not thinking): On the role of non-conceptual cognition in early Buddhist thought (Robert
Sharf)*
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-16:00: Can insentient objects become Buddhas? The Indian background to a Chinese Buddhist debate (Robert Sharf)*
Tuesday, July 5: The Birth of Chan in the Tang Period
10:00-12:00: Text reading: Two Ox-head Chan lineage texts—Treatise on No-Mind (Wuxin lun), and Treatise on the Cessation of Discernment (Jueguan lun) (Robert
Sharf)**
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-16:00: Student presentations (moderated by Robert Sharf)*
Wednesday, July 6: Insentient Things Becoming Buddhas cont.
10:00-12:00: Text reading: Zutang ji 祖堂集 (Christoph Anderl)**
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-15:30: Text reading: Jingde chuandeng lu 景德傳燈錄 (Christoph Anderl)**
Thursday, July 7: Chan “Public Cases” (gong’an, Japanese: kōan)
10:00-12:00: Indian and Chinese literary antecedents of Chan gong’an: Aṣṭasāhasrikā-prajñāpāramitā, Gongsun Longzi, Zhuangzi, Shishuoxinyu, etc.
(Robert Sharf)*
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-15:30: A reading of the Gateless Barrier (Wumenguan) (Robert Sharf)*
Friday, July 8: Buddhist Modernism: Chan, Zen, and the Mindfulness Movement
10:00-12:00: How Buddhism became “spiritual but not religious” (Robert Sharf)*
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-16:00: Open discussion on the study of Chan and the field of Buddhist studies (moderated by Robert Sharf)*
* Lectures also suitable for a general audience (no Sinological background needed) (15 hours)
** Sinological background needed (6 hours)

 

Update: doctoral school pictures

Doctoral School “Buddhism and Medicine in East Asia”, June 28-July 2, 2021

Abstract: This specialist course will focus on an interdisciplinary approach to the intersection of religion and medicine in medieval and late imperial East Asia, with a particular focus on Buddhism. As a religious and cultural tradition with transnational scope, Buddhism played an important role in circulating medical knowledge around Asia. This course focuses on this history from the perspectives of Religious Studies, History of Medicine, Sinology, and Translation Studies.

Level – Target audience

PhD students with a background in Chinese studies and/or in Chinese religions or in the history/anthropology of medicine. A good knowledge of pre-modern and modern Chinese language is expected for the students attending the classes requiring a sinological background.

Organising & Scientific Committee

  • Contact persons: prof. Ann Heirman, Faculty of Arts and Philosophy, Department: Languages and Cultures, E-mail: and mathieu.torck@ugent.be
  • prof. Christoph Anderl (Department: Languages and Cultures – East Asia), Ghent University
  • prof. Andreas Niehaus (Department: Languages and Cultures – East Asia), Ghent University

Topic

Between 150 and 1100 CE, Buddhism played a central role in introducing Indian medicine to East Asia. This historically represented a relatively discrete corpus of health-related knowledge, relatively unintegrated into East Asian medicine and often ignored in mainstream medical historiography. Nevertheless, Buddhist sources are critical to understanding the history of medicine in medieval East Asia, and it is not an exaggeration to say that this corpus offers one of the most voluminous sources of textual evidence for the transregional communication and reception of medical ideas in first millennium CE Asia that is available anywhere. Buddhist ideas and practices deserve more attention than they have received thus far from Sinologists and scholars of East Asia. This course is meant to introduce young scholars to this exciting emergent field, and to give them the tools to enter into this arena of scholarship.

Objectives and learning outcomes

The course is to provide intensive training for doctoral students with a background in East Asian history, Chinese studies, Chinese religions, Buddhist studies, history of medicine, and/or history of science. Half of the course is dedicated to lectures, and the other half to interaction with students, including a presentation of their dissertation projects, text readings, discussions, and the screening of documentary films. The course is meant to provide students with an insight into the intersection between Buddhism and medicine in East Asia. In detail, the course aims:
1) to enhance students’ understanding of the intersections between religion and medicine in the pre-modern world;
2) to provide new insights into the role of Buddhism in cross-cultural exchange of science, medicine, and technology;
3) to provide students with a knowledge of the practice of Buddhism and healing in contemporary Chinese and diasporic communities;
4) to enhance the students’ presentation competences
5) (for the sinological group) to improve students’ skills in classical Chinese through the reading of examples of Chinese Buddhist literature.

Dates and Program

From Monday 28 June to Friday 2 July 2021 (details see program hereunder)

  • Monday, June 28, 2021: Orientations

10:00-10:30: Welcome Greetings*
10:30-12:00: Buddhist medicine in a global context (Pierce Salguero)*
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-16:00: Presentation of current research projects/questions by all participants (moderated by Leslie de Vries)*

  • Tuesday, June 29, 2021: Medieval China

10:00-12:00: Buddhist healing in medieval China (Pierce Salguero) *
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-15:30: Health and bodily practices in Chinese Buddhist monastic practice (Ann Heirman) *

  • Wednesday, June 30, 2021: Cross-cultural movements and translations

10:00-12:00: Buddhism and medicine in transit (China, Japan, Vietnam) (Leslie de Vries)*
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-15:30: Analysis of medieval Chinese practices of translation (Pierce Salguero)**

  • Thursday, July 1, 2021: Primary Text Readings

10:00-12:00: Text reading: “On Eliminating Disease” from Sūtra of Golden Light (Pierce Salguero)**
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-15:30: Text reading: “Buddhism and scholarly medicine: A selection of passages from the medical literature” (Leslie de Vries)**

  • Friday, July 2, 2021: Integrating Research and Teaching

10:00-12:00: Film screening and discussion: Buddhist healing in a contemporary diasporic community in North America (Pierce Salguero)*
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-16:00: Open discussion about integrating research and teaching based on this seminar (moderated by Andreas Niehaus)*

* Lectures also suitable for a general audience (no Sinological background needed)
** Sinological background needed

Venue

ONLINE

Lecturers

  • C. Pierce Salguero, Penn State University (Abington College)

Contact details: ; 302 Sutherland Bldg., 1600 Woodland Rd., Abington PA 19001 USA.
Pierce Salguero is a transdisciplinary medical humanities scholar who is fascinated by historical and contemporary intersections between Buddhism, medicine, and cross-cultural exchange. He has a PhD in History of Medicine from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine (2010), and a Master’s Degree in East Asian Studies from University of Virginia (2005).
Thus far, Pierce Salguero has produced an academic monograph on medieval China, an edited volume on China and Japan, a two-volume collection of translations from around the world, thirteen peer-reviewed academic articles and book chapters, and a number of other translations, encyclopaedia entries, and public scholarship projects on various aspects of Buddhism and medicine in East Asia. A second monograph, a global history of Buddhist engagements with health and healing, is under contract with Columbia University Press. He has become well known as a leading specialist in this field through his publication projects, various online professional networks, as well as through his frequent organization of and participation in conferences, workshops, and collaborative online projects. His editorial work with the journal Asian Medicine has also been important to the academic world, and he became the Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He has been invited to present his research at many prestigious American universities, as well as internationally in Canada, England, Germany, Korea, and Taiwan. His research has been recognized by fellowships from humanities centers at the University of Pennsylvania (2011–12) and Duke University (Fall 2013), and has been funded by Fulbright (2008–09), the Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation (2009–10), the National Research Foundation of Korea (2015–17), University of Leipzig (2017), and various awards from Penn State.

 

  • Leslie de Vries, University of Kent

Contact details: ; Department of Religious Studies, SECL, Cornwallis North West, University of Kent, Canterbury, CT2 7NF, United Kingdom. Leslie de Vries is a historian of religion and medicine in East Asia. He holds a PhD degree in Oriental Languages and Cultures (Ghent, 2012). From 2013 to 2015, he was a Research Fellow in the Wellcome Trust funded project “Beyond Tradition: Styles of Practice and Ways of Knowing in East Asian Medicine, 1100 to the present” at the University of Westminster. Since 2018, he is a Lecturer in East Asian Studies at the University of Kent.
Leslie de Vries is a leading scholar researching the intersections of medicine and religion in East Asia during the late imperial/early modern period. In his forthcoming monograph, The Thread that Runs Through Medicine: A Style of Practice in Seventeenth-Century China (Berghahn), and earlier journal articles, including “The Authentic Man as Ideal for the Late Ming Dynasty Physician: Daoist Inner Alchemy in Zhang Jiebin’s Commentary on the Huangdi neijing” (Synthesis Philosophica 2014) and “The Dangers of ‘Warming and Replenishing’ (wenbu 溫補) during the Ming to Qing Epistemic Transition” (Asian Medicine 2015), he focused on medicine and the Three Teaching (Buddhism, Confucianism and Daoism) in China. Leslie de Vries is also one of the very few specialists researching Vietnam’s pre-modern medical history. In this field, he published “The Dồng Nhân Pagoda and the Publication of Mister Lazy’s Medical Encyclopedia” (2017) and “Vietnam in the Premodern Period” (forthcoming). Work in progress include research on Buddhist trajectories of medical knowledge transmission from China to Vietnam and Japan in the aftermath of the Ming-Qing transition. As a leading expert, Leslie de Vries is frequently invited to specialist workshops at renowned institutions (Oxford, Cornell, Max Planck Munich, Heidelberg, …). He organised and co-organised international academic conferences (Kent, Michigan) and acts as Book Review Editor (China) for Asian Medicine.

Registration fee

Free of charge for PhD students of the Doctoral School of Arts, Humanities and Law at Ghent University

Registration

Please follow this link: https://webappsx.ugent.be/eventManager/events/buddmedeastasia

Teaching materials

Reading materials (required readings and suggested readings), electronic sources, and the source texts to be translated in class will be (electronically) provided to the participants prior to the course.

Number of participants

Maximum 20

Evaluation criteria (doctoral training programme)

100% attendance (sinological group 20 hrs, non sinological group 16 hrs); active participation (text reading, individual presentations by doctoral researchers, discussions).

Doctoral School “Sino-Tibetan Languages: Research Methodologies and Approaches to Linguistic Field Studies and Language Documentation among Tibeto-Burman Speaking Minorities in China”, October 26–30, 2020

Abstract: This specialist course will focus on an interdisciplinary approach to the Sino-Tibetan (ST) language family, with an emphasis on languages of the Tibeto-Burman (TB) branch spoken by ethnic minorities in China. In the course there will be an emphasis on linguistic aspects, such as the genetic relations between the ST languages in a historical perspective, comparative approaches to the study of language families, fieldwork research on endangered languages, fieldwork methodologies, as well as the cultural and religious background of ST speaking ethnic minorities in China.

Thanks to the generous support of the TIANZHU FOUNDATION, we are pleased to award up to 800 Euros in travel remuneration of five international PhD students. This money can be used for travel, accommodation, and meals. To apply for this travel grant, please send a one-page cover letter and your CV to Christoph.anderl@ugent.be by July 31st, 2020. The selected candidates will be notified by August 10th , 2020.

Organizers
Name: Prof. Christoph Anderl
Faculty: Arts and Philosophy
Department: Languages and Cultures (Ghent Centre for Buddhist Studies / DiaLing)
E-mail: Christoph.anderl@ugent.be
Co-organizers:
Prof. Ann Heirman (Languages and Cultures – East Asia)
Prof. Linda Badan (Translation, Interpreting and Communication / MULTIPLES / DiaLing)

Course
Title: Sino-Tibetan Languages: Research Methodologies and Approaches to Linguistic Field Studies and Language Documentation among Tibeto-Burman Speaking Minorities in China
Dates: October 26 – 30, 2020
Venue: Het Pand, Ghent
Based on the current Covid19 situation, the DS could be also transformed into an online event, if necessary.

Topic of the course

The course focuses on the Sino-Tibetan language family and Tibeto-Burman languages as spoken in Southwestern regions of China, as well as the sociocultural, religious, and ecological contexts of ethnic minorities of these regions. The DS will provide an overview of ST languages in a historical perspective, and deal with the research of language families in a comparative context (especially contrasting / comparing the Indo-European and Sino-Tibetan groups). More specifically, the focus will be on Tibeto-Burman languages as spoken in the Southwestern region of Yunnan, China, many of them being endangered and on the verge of becoming extinct. The linguistic aspects will be discussed in a contextualized way, giving consideration to the sociocultural, religious (e.g., Buddhism, Christianity, and native religions), and environmental / ecological aspects of the ethnic minority communities. Another part of the course will concretely deal with linguistic fieldwork methodologies and the documentation of endangered languages.
Tentative programme with time schedule: The five-day course will have 5 – 6 contact hours a day (ca. 27 contact hours all together), includinglectures, discussions of research material, presentations by the PhD students, round-table discussions, and documentary film screenings.

Program

Monday, October 26th:

11:30 Welcome Greetings (C. Anderl; A. Heirman; L. Badan) / Opening of Zoom room

12:00-14:00: Sino-Tibetan Languages: Introduction and Historical Perspective (Nathan Hill)

14:30-15:30: Tibeto-Burman Languages: An Introduction (Nathan Hill)

15:45-16:45: Sino-Tibetan Languages: Research Methodologies in a Comparative Perspective 1 (Nathan Hill)

Tuesday, October 27th:

12:00-14:00: Linguistic Field Work Methodologies 1: New Developments (Nathan Hill)

14:30-15:30: Sino-Tibetan Languages: Research Methodologies in a Comparative Perspective 2 (Nathan Hill)

15:30-16:15: Discussion with Students (C. Anderl; N. Hill; J. Wang; L. Badan)

Wednesday, October 28th:

10:00-12:00: Religion and Culture of the Biyo Communities of Southwestern China (PhD student Shan Bai) / Discussions

13:00-15:00: Introduction to the Hani language group (Wang Jianhua)

15:15-17:15: Interactive Presentations of StudentsÕ PhD Projects*

Thursday, October 29th:

10:00-12:00: Linguistic Field Work Methodologies 2: Field Work Among Hani Communities in Southwestern China and Beyond (Wang Jianhua)

13:00-15:00: Presentation of a Documentary Film on Minorities in Southwestern China (Wang Jianhua)

15:30-17:30: Interactive Presentation of StudentsÕ PhD Projects**

Friday, October 30th:

12:00-14:00: Linguistic Field Work Methodologies 3 (Linda Badan)

14:30-16:00: Final Discussion with Students(C. Anderl; N. Hill; J. Wang; L. Badan)*
Presentations: (1) Selin Grollmann (Univ. of Bern): A grammar of Nachiring: Describing an endangered language of eastern Nepal /(2) Valentina Punzi (Univ. of Tartu): Linguistic identity and cultural heritagization in the Sino-Tibetan borderlands: reflections of a 90hou Baima ritual expert on mother tongue / (3) Nikita Kuzmin (Univ. of Pennsylvania): ÒHow to master the Tangut language? A newview on Tangut manuscripts with Tibetan glosses from Khara-khoto ** Presentations: (4) Deng Bingcong (Max Planck Institute, Euroasia3angle Project): Transeurasian loanwords in Sino-Tibetan: Whatcan they tell us? / (5) Pascal Gerber (Univ. Bern): A historical grammar of Mewahang: Aim, Methods and Preliminary Findings / (6) Bai Shan (Ghent Univ.): Field studies among Biyo communities

Doctoral School “Chinese Buddhist Historical Records in the Context of Digital Humanities”, October 21–25, 2019

Abstract: The Doctoral School’s specialist course will focus on historical literature, including local gazetteers and Transmission of the Lamp texts, of the Chinese Buddhist schools. While adopting a diachronic perspective, covering texts between the 10th and the 17th century, the special angle of the course is to relate the study of historical sources to modern technologies and most recent advances in Digital Humanities. This will offer students important insights in key Chinese text genres and their study based on modern research tools. This specialist course contributes to the FROGBEAR project.

Description:

Date: October 21–25, 2019
Venue: Het Pand (Ghent University)

Thanks to the generous support of the Tianzhu foundation, we are pleased to award up to 800 Euros in travel remuneration for 5 International PhD students. This money can be used for travel, accommodation, and meals. To apply for this travel grant, please send a one-page cover letter and your CV to Ann.Heirman@ugent.be.

Lecturers

  • Prof. Marcus Bingenheimer (Temple University)
  • Prof. Christian Wittern (Kyoto University)
  • Prof. Christoph Anderl (Ghent University)
  • Sally Chambers (Center for Digital Humanities, Ghent)
  • Prof. Ann Heirman (Ghent University)

Schedule

October 21 – 25, 2019

 

Day One, Monday
Location: Jan Gillis
09:30: Welcome by the Doctoral School organizers (CA and AH)
10:00 – 11:00:* Lecture and discussion 1: Gazetteers literature, reference tools, and print editions of Buddhist Temple Gazetteers (MB)
11:00 – 11:15: Coffee
11:15 – 12:15: Practice session 1: material in printed form (45 mins. practice, 15 mins reports) (MB)
12:15 – 14:15: Lunch break
14:15 – 15:15: Lecture and discussion 2: The Digital Archive of Chinese Buddhist Temple Gazetteers at DDBC (archive / dataset part) (MB)
15:15 – 15:30: Coffee
15:30 – 16:30: Practice session 2: Digital datasets (45 mins. practice, 15 mins reports) (MB)

 

Day Two, Tuesday
Location: Dormitoriumzaal
10:00 – 11:00: Lecture and discussion 3: The Digital Archive of Chinese Buddhist Temple Gazetteers at DDBC (online interface) (MB)
11:00 – 11:15: Coffee
11:15 – 12:15: Text reading 1: Ming-Qing Biographical data and gazetteers (MB)
12:15 – 14:15: Lunch break
14:15 – 15:00: Lecture and discussion 4: The Gazetteers of Mt. Putuo – Chinese whispers or reliable text witness? (MB)
15:00 – 15:15: Coffee
15:15 – 16:15: Text reading 2: Reading of selected historical sources (MB)
16:15 – 17:00: Discussions and Q&A with students (MB and CW)

 

Day Three, Wednesday
Location: Amaat Burssens room (Faculty Library, 2nd floor, behind the Japanese collection)
9:45 – 10:45:* Lecture and discussion 5: A short introduction to the Ghent Database of Chinese Medieval Texts as a flexible research tool (CA, with MB)
10:45 – 11:00: Coffee**
11:00 – 12:30: Presentation of students’ projects 1 (MB, CW, SC, CA)
12:30 – 14:15: Lunch break
14:15 – 15:15: Presentation of students’ projects 2 (MB, CW, SC, CA)
15:15 – 15:30: Coffee**
15:30 – 17:00:* Short presentation of Ghent Centre for Digital Humanities; Discussions and Q&A with students and Digital Humanities researchers from Ghent University: Recent trends in Digital Humanities from an interdisciplinary perspective (SC, MB, CW, CA)

** Note that the coffee breaks on Wednesday will be in the kitchen facilities of the Department of Languages of Cultures (5th floor). Somebody will guide you there, so don’t worry, you won’t miss your coffee!

Day Four, Thursday
Location: Jan Gillis
09:30 – 10:00: Coffee
10:00 – 12:00:* Lecture and discussion 6: Digitization of printed and manuscript historical records: general and specific problems, methods, and results (with example from recent digitization projects of Chan records and the Daoist canon) (CW, with MB and CA)
12:00 – 14:00: Lunch break
14:00 – 15:15: Text reading 3: Reading of selected Chan records (CW)
15:15 – 15:30: Coffee
15:30 – 16:30: Text reading 3 (continued): Reading of selected Chan records (CW)

Day Five, Friday
Location: Jan Gillis
09:30 – 10:00: Coffee
10:00 – 12:00: Text reading 4: Reading of selected Chan records (CW)
12:00 – 14:00: Lunch break
14:00 – 15:30: Text reading 5: Reading and discussion of selected Chan records (CW)
15:30 – 15:45: Coffee
15:45 – 16:30: Final discussions and Q&A with students (CW, with MB und CA)

 

Lecturers /Speakers:
MB = Marcus Bingenheimer
CW = Christian Wittern
CA = Christoph Anderl
AH = Ann Heirman
SC = Sally Chambers (Digital Humanities Research Coordinator, Ghent Centre for Digital Humanities)

Doctoral School “Women and Nuns in Chinese Buddhism”, Ghent University, June 3–7, 2019

Abstract: The Doctoral School specialist course will focus on “Women and Nuns in Chinese Buddhism”. While adopting a diachronic perspective, it will give ample space to the twentieth and early twenty-first century. This will offer students insight into the status of Chinese Buddhist nuns and women in contemporary Chinese society and within the Buddhist world as a whole. This specialist course contributes to the FROGBEAR project.

Description:

Date: June 3–7 2019
Venue: Het Pand (Ghent University)

Thanks to the generous support of the Tianzhu Buddhist Network, we are pleased to award up to 800 Euros in travel remuneration for 5 International PhD students. This money can be used for travel, accommodation, and meals. To apply for this travel grant, please send a one-page cover letter and your CV to Ann.Heirman@ugent.be. The selected candidates will be notified by March 10th.

Lecturers

  • Prof. Ester Bianchi, University of Perugia.
  • Prof. Yu-chen Li (李玉珍), National Cheng Chi University (Taiwan)
  • Prof. Ann Heirman, Ghent University
  • Prof. Chia Longman, Ghent University

Tentative schedule

The five-day course will have 5 contact hours a day (25 contact hours all together) that include lectures, text readings, presentations by the participants, discussions, and documentary film screenings.

 

Monday, June 3rd : Buddhist Nuns and Women Between India and China

9:30: Welcome Greetings
10:00-12:00: Women in Buddhism: A General Introduction (Ester Bianchi) *
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-15:30: The Foundation and Early History of the Nuns’ Order in China (Ann Heirman)*
15:30-16:30: Screening of the Documentary Film The Buddhist Nuns on Emei Mountain (in English) (Ester Bianchi) *

Tuesday, June 4th : Chinese Buddhist Nuns and Women Throughout the Ages

10:00-12:00: Exemplary Buddhist Nuns and Women: Readings from the Chinese Buddhist Canon (Ester Bianchi) **
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-15:30: Buddhist Nuns and Women in Tang China, with Text Reading (Li Yu-chen) **
15:30-16:30: Methodological Discussion with Students, Moderated by Ester Bianchi and Chia Longman*

Wednesday, June 5th : The Nuns’ Ordination in China and Beyond

10:00-12:00: Buddhist Nuns’ Ordination in Twentieth Century China: Rules, Criteria, Narratives (Ester Bianchi)*
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-14:30: Nuns’ Ordination: The Taiwanese Case  (Li Yu-chen)*
14:30-16:30: Interactive presentation of Students’ PhD Projects*

Thursday, June 6th : Education and Erudition of Nuns in Modern Times

10:00-12:00: Meeting with Modernity: Buddhist Women During Republican China (Ester Bianchi)*
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-14:30: Screening of the Documentary Film on Longlian 《當代第一比丘尼隆蓮法師》(in Chinese) (Ester Bianchi) **
14:30-16:30: Interactive Presentation of Students’ PhD Projects*

Friday, June 7th : Nowadays Nuns and Women in Chinese Buddhism

10:00-12:00: Nuns and Women in the PRC (Ester Bianchi)*
12:00-13:30: Lunch Break
13:30-15:30: Taiwanese Nuns in the Contemporary Era (Li Yu-chen)*
15:30-16:30: Final Discussion with Students, Moderated by Ester Bianchi and Chia Longman*

* Lectures also suitable for a general audience (no Sinological background needed) (20 hours)
** Sinological background needed (5 hours)

Doctoral School “Chinese Writing and Lexicography in Medieval China”, October 8-12, 2018

Abstract

This Doctoral School will address key questions concerning medieval Chinese writing practices and manuscript culture, in addition to providing an introduction to important historical lexicographical material. As such, the course will address essential issues concerning the research of and work with medieval Chinese source materials.

Description

The course is aimed at PhD students specializing in medieval China and medieval Chinese texts and manuscripts (focusing on the period between 5th and 10th century), as well as various aspects of Chinese writing. The course will enhance the PhD students’ understanding of the highly complex mechanisms concerning the production of Chinese handwritten manuscripts and the multifaceted use of Chinese characters. In addition to a general introduction to issues of Chinese writing (with a focus on Medieval Chinese), the discussion and reading of important source materials (e.g., Dunhuang manuscripts) will be one of the focal points of the lectures. Several aspects of medieval Chinese handwriting will receive special attention, such as phenomena of “standardization” and “variation”, the phonetic use of Chinese characters in manuscripts (phonetic loans / phonophoric elements), as well as historical material on the acquisition of writing / writing exercises among the Dunhuang findings. This will enable the students to gain a clearer understanding of medieval writing practices, help them in their critical approach to source materials, and concretely enhance their ability to decipher historical textual material. In the second part of the course, questions of lexicographical encoding, Chinese characters classification, and the organization of lexicographical material will be discussed. This part aims at helping the students to become familiar with the structure of these works, and enabling them to make use of this important type of source material. The course will also provide the opportunity for discussions with the PhD students and individual tutoring.

Instructors/lecturers

Prof. Imre GALAMBOS – Cambridge University – Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies – University of Cambridge – Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge CB3 9DA, UK
Imre Galambos is one of the world’s leading experts on the development of Chinese writing. Besides being an expert in Ancient Chinese writing, he has worked extensively on many aspects of the palaeography of medieval Dunhuang manuscripts, as well as manuscript culture. From 2002-2016 he was the Project Manager of the large International Dunhuang Project at the British Library, London, one of the world’s largest depositories comprising of 10.000s of Dunhuang manuscripts. Since recently, he has also been the President of the European Association for the Study of Chinese Manuscripts.

Supporting lecturers
Dr. Christoph Anderl and Dr. Ann Heirman

Time Schedule and Venue

October 8 to October 12, 2018

Venuehet Pand, Onderbergen 1, 9000 Gent, room Jan Gillis

  • Monday, October 8th

09:30: Welcome of the participants by the Doctoral School organizers (Christoph AnderlAnn Heirman)

* 10:00 – 12:00: General introduction to Chinese writing (Imre Galambos)

12:00 – 13:30: lunch break

13:30 – 15:00: Introduction: Aspects of writing practices in Dunhuang manuscripts (Imre Galambos)

15:15 – 16:45: Dunhuang manuscripts containing writing exercises / “schooling” manuscripts (Imre Galambos)

  • Tuesday, October 9th

10:00 – 12:00: Outside influences in Chinese writing (Imre Galambos)

12:00 – 13:30: lunch break

13:30 – 15:30: Segmentation and presentation of Chinese texts / text readings (Imre Galambos)

  • Wednesday, October 10th

10:00 – 13:00: Aspects of “standard and variation” (Imre Galambos)

13:00 – 14:00: lunch break

14:00 – 17:00 Discussion / meetings with students, Q+A / presentation of a selection of PhD projects on writing (Imre GalambosChristoph Anderl)

  • Thursday, October 11th

* 10:00 – 12:00: Chinese medieval lexicography: An introduction / presentation of the Ghent Database of Medieval Chinese Texts (Christoph Anderl)

12:00 – 13:30: lunch break

13:30 – 15:30: The structure of the 10th century dictionary Longkan shoujing (Christoph Anderl)

  • Friday, October 12th

* 10:00 – 12:00: Reading of selected passages of the LKSJ (Christoph Anderl)

12:00 – 13:30: lunch break

13:30 – 15:00: Phonophoric elements in the classification system of LKSJ (Christoph Anderl)

15:15 – 17:00: Final discussions with students / short presentations of student projects (Christoph AnderlAnn Heirman)

* Lectures also suitable for a more general audience (including PhD students of general linguistics, etc.)

 

Doctoral school “Buddhism and Silk Culture”, May 28-June 1, 2018

Abstract: Doctoral school on “Buddhism and Silk Culture” features Stuart Young as a guest lecturer. The course aimed to enhance the PhD researchers’ understanding of key questions pertaining to the role of Buddhism in these contexts. While offering a thorough analysis of essential text material in the Chinese medieval period, the instructor, assisted by the organizers, will also introduce specific methodologies of research in medieval Chinese Buddhism, from an East Asian historical, as well as from a religious perpsective.

  • May 28 – June 1, 2018

Venuehet Pand, Onderbergen 1, 9000 Gent

  • DAY 1: Monday 28 May, 2018 (lunch break 12:00-13:30)

09:30: Welcome of the participants by the Doctoral School organizers (Ann Heirman, Christoph Anderl)
10:00 – 12:00: Course overview: Buddhism in the silk cultures of medieval China; The Chinese history, technology, and vocabulary of silk and sericulture* (lecture, with active participation)
12:00 – 13:30: lunch break
13:30 – 15:30: Research sources primary and secondary, textual, visual, and material; Archaeology of Chinese Silk, Dunhuang 敦煌 and Famensi 法門寺 (interactive presentation and discussion of sources)

  • DAY 2: Tuesday 29 May, 2018 (lunch break 12:00-13:30)

10:00 – 12:00: Vinaya and material culture (Ann Heirman)* (lecture with active participation)
12:00 – 13:30: lunch break
13:30 – 15:30: Silk in the Vinaya (disciplinary monastic rules) and Chinese Vinaya Commentaries (1: Dharmaguptaka)

  • DAY 3: Wednesday 30 May, 2018 (lunch break 12:00-13:30)

10:00 – 12:00: Silk in the Vinaya and Chinese Vinaya Commentaries (2: Sarvāstivāda and Mahīśāsaka)
12:00 – 13:30: lunch break
13:30 – 15:30: Discussion with students, Q+A

  • DAY 4: Thursday 31 May, 2018 (lunch break 12:00-13:30)

10:00 – 12:00: Daoxuan’s 道宣 (596-667) Xingshi chao 行事鈔 commentary on the silk bedding precept
12:00 – 13:30: lunch break
13:30 – 15:30: Daoxuan’s commentaries in comparison with Dajue大覺 (fl. 712)

  • DAY 5: Friday 1 June, 2018 (lunch break 12:00-13:30)

10:00 – 12:00: Chinese views of silk in India: travelogues, hagiographies, miracle tales (1)
12:00 – 13:30: lunch break
13:30 – 15:00: Chinese views of silk in India: travelogues, hagiographies, miracle tales (2)
15:00 – 16:00: Final discussions with students (Stuart Young, Ann Heirman, Christoph Anderl)

* Lectures also suitable for a more general audience (including PhD students of (art) history, etc.)

This doctoral school was generously sponsored by the Tianzhu Buddhist Network.